Our Post-Season Boat Maintenance video is coming soon. In the meantime, please see the script below.

Like so many of us, you hate to see the boating season end. You have made wonderful memories with your family and friends over the course of the boating season on your Veranda and are reaping the benefits of the patented interlocking deck system and the “lifetime of enjoyment” it provides. Whether it’s the end of your boating season or you need to put your Veranda into storage for several months, there will come a time when you need to correctly prepare your Veranda for storage.

Hi there again, I’m Tommy Sanders, the host of the Veranda Luxury Pontoons online owner’s manual, and today we define six helpful steps for proper post-season boat maintenance, as approved by Veranda Luxury Pontoons and Yamaha. We recommend consulting your local authorized Veranda Luxury Pontoons dealer who has certified Yamaha technicians on staff to provide post-season boat maintenance service.

If you are inclined, this video covers how to change your oil, fog the engine, grease fittings, how to change or add fuel stabilizer, wash and dry your Veranda. If followed, these maintenance steps will help ensure you a lifetime of enjoyment from your investment. Self-service maintenance will not affect the Yamaha warranty, provided it’s done properly and uses the proper supplies. Yamaha recommends that all Yamaha outboard owners (especially DIYers) download and use the MyYamahaOutboards app to record and track their maintenance.  Learn more at www.yamahaoutboards.com/myyamahaoutboards. Another helpful tip is to always keep a record of your receipts for the products purchased to perform DIY maintenance if you choose to do so. Once again, we highly recommend consulting your local authorized Veranda Luxury Pontoons dealer who has certified Yamaha technicians on staff to provide post-season boat maintenance service.

CHANGE OIL & FILTER

Step one. Change oil and filter. The process starts with changing the crankcase oil:

  1. First, place an oil pan under the lower unit and with the engine trimmed all the way up.
  2. Next, remove the drain plug located inside the rubber tube below the rear of the cowling.
  3. After the oil has finished draining, replace the drain plug.

Place a piece of plastic tubing as an extension over the rubber tube to direct the oil into the pan and lower the engine using the trim switch on the starboard side to start the oil flowing. Next, change the oil filter. 
With the engine still down, slide the oil pan directly underneath the lower unit and remove the gearcase drain plug on the starboard side to remove the old lubricant. 
Check the old oil for discoloration or a foamy residue, which is an indication that water could be getting into the lower unit through a damaged seal. The most common cause of this problem is picking up discarded fishing line behind the propeller. 
While that gearcase is draining, remove the engine oil filter found on the port side. You can use an oil filter wrench or on these smaller engines, a simple strap wrench works fine. Be careful not to disturb the oil sensor located on the block above the filter. Moisten the rubber gasket on the new filter with a little fresh engine oil to assure a proper seal and then install by hand tightening the filter until it is snug. Refill the crankcase with the proper amount of Yamaha engine oil. To refill the lower unit with fresh gear case oil, first, remove the vent screw located directly above the drain plug. Dealers winterize so many outboards they use a bulk can of Yamalube® Gearcase Oil with a pump, but that probably won’t be necessary for you at home. Threads the fill hose into the drain plug hole and carefully pump in the lubricant until it starts weeping out of the upper vent.

For DIYers, Yamaha offers two options:

  1. An inexpensive hand pump that fits quart bottles of the Yamalube Gearcase Oil, which can be purchased from a local auto parts store.
  2. A plastic tube with threads that match the drain hole so you can simply squeeze the lubricant into the gear case.

Reinstall the vent plug until tight, then remove the applicator from the bottom and reinstall the drain plug. Warning: Do not attempt to fill from the top. For additional instruction please refer to the Engine Oil & Lube page on Yamaha Outboard’s Maintenance Matters.

FOG THE ENGINE
The second step in post-season boat maintenance is to fog the engine. Use a portable fuel tank with a small amount of fresh gas treated with Yamalube Ring Free, PLUS EFI Engine Storage Fogging Oil, and Yamalube Fuel Stabilizer & Conditioner Plus. Start by placing a hose flusher over the main lower unit water pickups and turn on the water. 
Then disconnect the fuel hose at the fuel filter by loosening the spring clamp with needle nose pliers and connecting the hose to the portable tank. Pump the ball to prime the engine and then start, allowing it to run for 10 minutes at a fast idle as the mixture is thoroughly distributed throughout the fuel system and combustion chambers to lubricate the injectors, valves, cylinder walls, and piston rings. 
When the 10 minutes are up, rev the engine briefly until you see a puff of smoke caused by the fogging oil exit through the prop hub and shut it down. Remove the hose from the portable tank and refit the onboard fuel hose. Leave the engine down to drain the water from the cooling system and disconnect the onboard flushing hose so that it drains, too. Then reconnect. For additional instruction please refer to the Extended Storage page on Yamaha Outboard’s Maintenance Matters.

GREASE FITTINGS

The third step is to grease the fittings. Tilt the engine up and use a grease gun charged with Yamaha marine grease to lubricate all grease fittings. There is one on each side of the steering slide near the front of the engine, one on the steering column, and one on the shift mechanism where the shift cables enter the cowling. To finish the job, spray the entire engine with Yamashield to repel moisture and prevent corrosion, and replace the cowling.

CHANGE FUEL FILTER
The fourth step in post-season boat maintenance involves changing the fuel filter. Replace your fuel filter by unscrewing and putting in the new filter. Dispose of the old filter and fuel properly.

ADD FUEL STABILIZER
The fifth step is to add fuel stabilizer. Add a fuel stabilizer to your fuel tank to keep the fuel fresh throughout the winter. Stabilized fuel will help make sure that your engine starts quick and easy next spring. It also helps prevent corrosion, rust, or other engine damage while in storage.

WASH & DRY
The final step in post-season boat maintenance is washing and drying your Veranda. We do suggest cleaning your boat before storing it for longer periods of time. We suggest using dishwashing soap, such as Dawn, and water for washing the boat. Customers can also use a pressure washer for the floors. You just need to make sure you are not using a high-pressure system and that you are careful.

There are countless automotive and marine cleaning solutions on the market that you can use for the logs and panels. We do not have a specific aluminum cleaner that we suggest. This is really up to the consumer on what they want to use. This is not something that affects the warranty. Whichever cleaner you use, the general directions are to apply the cleaner, scrub it into the aluminum, let it sit for several minutes, rinse it off and repeat if necessary. If you are unsure about how long to leave the cleaner on the aluminum, you can test it on a less-visible part of your pontoon. Be sure to read the instructions on the cleaning product to ensure proper usage.

Panels, vinyl seating, and flooring should be cleaned frequently with mild dish soap, warm water, and a soft cloth, paying special attention to crevices on the seats. For heavily soiled areas, we recommend using a 1:1 solution of Formula 409 or Fantastik and water. Rub gently and rinse with a water-dampened cloth or a thorough rinse with clean warm water. For more difficult stains, dampen a soft white cloth with a solution of household bleach (up to and no more than 10% bleach with 90% water). Rub gently and rinse with a water-dampened cloth to remove bleach concentration. Do not use alcohol-based cleaning agents.

 It is always recommended to consult with your local authorized dealer. If you wish to provide further protection, you can apply metal polish to the aluminum surfaces and wax the panels. This takes time, but if done correctly, will only need to be done once in a while. Many boat owners swear by Sharkhide or Biokleen metal polishes. In addition to a metal polish, you will need either a polishing ball on a standard cordless drill or an electric buffer with a lamb’s wool pad and a clean terry cloth.

Application of the metal polish should be done based on the directions on the container. Generally speaking, this will involve placing metal polish on a ball or pad, running the cordless drill or buffer clockwise at a slow speed to start, then increasing speed once the polish is absorbed. Guide it down the length of the pontoon while moving the applicator in a small ‘S’ pattern to blend the polish into the surface of the aluminum. After the polish is applied, buff it out or wipe it with a clean, dry cloth. You can also apply the polish by hand if you don’t have a buffer. Waxing panels can help prevent water spots, but it is not something that we recommend. It is really up to you, the consumer. We do not recommend waxing the powder-coated rails on your fence. It is not like a painted surface and will leave residue in the small textures of the powder coat.

If your Veranda Luxury Pontoon is equipped with hydraulic assist steering, UFLEX USA states that when storing your boat for an extended period of time beyond 4 months, we recommend having your dealer remove the steering cable end fitting from its engine side support and cleaning it adequately. Cover your boat. Make sure your boat is dry and cover it with a quality boat cover to keep your boat clean and electronics safe from the elements.

If possible, store out of water. This will keep your Veranda Luxury Pontoon safe from possible ice, or other problems that you did not account for over the winter months. We recommend that you have a boat lift at the very least, or even better, store your boat out of the water during the winter months. For additional instruction please refer to the External Appearance page on Yamaha Outboard’s Maintenance Matters.

We hope you have found this Veranda Luxury Pontoons owner’s manual segment on post-season boat maintenance very helpful to protect your investment and ensure a lifetime of enjoyment.

For additional information please reach out to your nearest authorized Veranda dealer or visit www.verandamarine.com.

Our Pre-Season Boat Maintenance video is coming soon. In the meantime, please see the script below.

The days are getting longer, which means it’s time to get your Veranda out of storage and water ready. Hello there, I’m Tommy Sanders, the host of the Veranda Luxury Pontoons online owner’s manual. This particular video segment covers 12 important steps for pre-season boat maintenance for your Veranda, as approved by Yamaha. We will cover everything from inspecting your battery, fuel lines, spark plugs, polishing and waxing your Veranda to inspecting your trailer. If followed, these maintenance steps will help ensure a safe and memorable boating season. We always recommend using one of our authorized dealers however Yamaha states that self-maintenance will not affect the Yamaha warranty, provided it’s done properly and using the proper supplies. Yamaha recommends that all Yamaha outboard owners (especially DIYers) download and use the MyYamahaOutboards app to record and track their maintenance.  Learn more at www.yamahaoutboards.com/myyamahaoutboards. Another helpful tip is to always keep a record of your receipts for the products purchased to perform DIY maintenance if you choose to do so. We highly recommend consulting your local authorized Veranda Luxury Pontoons dealer who has certified Yamaha technicians on staff to provide post-season boat maintenance service.

Inspect the Battery
Step one is to inspect your battery. There are several different types of marine batteries on the market, but Yamaha recommends using flooded lead acid or AGM (Absorbed Glass Mat) only. Your authorized Veranda Luxury Pontoons dealer installs the batteries when they prep the boat after receiving the shipment. The battery life for a boat is roughly five years. It is important to make certain that your battery held up well during the winter months. Start by topping off the battery with fresh, distilled water if it needs it, then give it a good thorough charge. Check the charge with a battery tester and if the battery still holds a strong charge, you’ll be in great shape. If not, you may want to get your authorized dealer to inspect your battery. If you have time, look for a good sale, and get a good quality battery. If the battery is in good shape, it’s still a good idea to scrub the battery clean of dirt or rust; anything really that can build up on it.  Next, clean the terminal post connections.  Make sure you remove the terminals and wires from the battery posts first! Finally, carefully reattach any wires or cables that were removed.  Coat terminals with lithium grease to protect them further from corrosion. For additional instruction please refer to the Electrical System page on Yamaha Outboard’s Maintenance Matters.

Check for Timing Belt
The second step in pre-season boat maintenance is to check the timing belt. Where is the belt located and how do you inspect it? Good questions! The timing belt is located under your Yamaha motor’s cowling on the top of the engine. The cowling on larger motors is heavy and fragile, so it may take two people to remove. The belt on your outboard should not have a lot of “give,” meaning that if you press down on it or give it any pressure, it should hold tight. Your Yamaha service manual states that the maximum the belt can stay on the engines is 5 years or 1,000 hours, whichever comes first. Each time a motor comes in for a service interval, the technician should inspect the timing belt and pulleys for premature wear, which is evident by belt dust around the pulleys of the timing belt. If the timing belt goes, it will cause significant, costly damage to your motor. We highly recommend having your local authorized Veranda Luxury Pontoons dealer check or replace these for you.

 Inspect the Cooling System
Step three is to inspect the cooling system. Your outboard cools via the water in which it sits. No matter the Veranda model engine type, water will be pulled through the motor by a water pump into the cooling system. The impeller is located inside the lower unit of your motor which can be accessed by removing your prop, anode and outdrive. Check the raw water impeller’s condition before you start the engine this season.  Any indication of wear means it should be replaced. On a related note, it is important to flush the motors after each use with fresh water, not lake water, especially for those who boat in saltwater environments. This will wash the saltwater out of the motor and in the case of fresh water motors, will wash out any freshwater debris.

Test and Check on Your Electronics
The fourth step in pre-season boat maintenance is testing and checking your electronics. Every switch, knob, button, and meter needs to be tested and checked before you even think about sailing away on your boat after de-winterization. Flip every switch on the helm and in the cabins. Don’t skip a single one! The same electrical system connects everything, so keep an eye out for any circuit on your Veranda. In the event you have any questions, refer to our Online Owner’s Manual for any electrical tips that you may need further information on, or contact your local authorized Veranda Luxury Pontoons dealer.

Inspect All Fuel Lines and Fluid Levels
Next, you will need to inspect all fuel lines and fluid levels on your Veranda. Colder weather can be very difficult on your boat’s hoses, including fuel lines. You need to be sure that you do a thorough and detailed inspection of these fuel lines and other hoses. Is your fuel filter clean and clear? If it is great! If not, get it replaced. As we mentioned earlier, you’ll want to make sure all fluids are filled to their appropriate level to prevent a loss of fuel or coolant when out on the water. If your engine is not a two-cycle outboard, you should have replaced the engine oil when you winterized. If not, it should be done before this season. In either case, always check the oil level before starting the engine the first time for the season. Not only could low fluid levels cause problems but the wear and tear on these systems will cost a lot of money in the future if not maintained properly!

Check on the Distributor and Spark Plugs
The sixth step in pre-season boat maintenance involves checking the distributor and spark plugs. Cleaning the distributor on your boat is very important. When a distributor is neglected, it can corrode and cause poor engine performance and even stop it from running. Instead, you’ll want to remove the distributor cap and make sure it is nice and clean. If the contacts are corroded, replace the cap. When you are done with that, make sure all spark plugs are in good condition and tight. If it has not been done recently, a full tune-up with new spark plugs and even new wires is always a good idea.

Replace Your Zinc Anode(s)
Next, you will want to replace your zinc anodes if you have one. If you replaced the boat’s zinc anodes when you winterized, you are good to go. These are typically located on the underwater portion of an outboard motor, or on the propeller shaft of inboard boats; sometimes on the hull itself.  Zinc anodes are important because they prevent galvanic corrosion of metals on your boat and engine that occur in a marine environment, especially saltwater. They are also called “sacrificial zincs” because they are designed to corrode before steel and other metals. That means they are designed to dissolve and they need to be replaced regularly. Generally, if the zinc has lost more than half of its original material, it should be replaced.

Watch Out for Animal Hibernation
The eighth phase of pre-season boat maintenance concerns watching out for animals hibernation while your pontoon sat in storage. Many people don’t consider that insects and arachnids may want to take shelter in their warm, covered boats. Mice, in particular, have been known to gnaw into seating and make a warm nest inside there during the winter months. Don’t let this be you. Make sure you NEVER have food left in the boat over the off-season to reduce rodent infestation. Also, check all nooks and crannies for any bugs or spiders that may have taken refuge in your boat. If you find some unwanted critters, try using humane or non-toxic chemicals or traps that will remove them from your boat and send them on their way.

Check the Propeller

Next, you will want to check your propeller. While you’ve got the boat out of the water, let’s check the condition of the propeller. Only in transit and when stored on-shore is your propeller out of the water. Now is a good time to check for dents, corrosion, or any loose or damaged parts. You’ll also want to make sure that everything is in great shape and that nothing has been stuck or tangled between the prop and the spindle, such as fishing line, or the boat bottom that you missed when winterized. If you find that the propeller is damaged for some reason, you should remove it and have it repaired or even replace it, depending on the damage, by a local authorized Veranda Luxury Pontoons dealer who has Yamaha certified technicians on staff. For additional instruction please refer to the Propeller Solutions page on Yamaha Outboard’s Maintenance Matters.

 Clean
The tenth step in pre-season boat maintenance involves some deep cleaning. You will want to clean the boat thoroughly before you let your friends, family, and pets onto your vessel. Boats get wet. That’s standard. But that also means that mold and mildew can build up on boats and vessels very easily if left unchecked. Make sure you are thoroughly cleaning any mold or mildewed areas of your boat. Vacuum all storage spaces and seating. For additional instruction please refer to the External Appearance page on Yamaha Outboard’s Maintenance Matters.

Polish and Wax
Many boat owners take a lot of pride in their boat and work very hard to keep it looking fantastic all year round. If you’re one of those, you may want to polish and wax your boat. Polishing the aluminum logs and waxing panels can help prevent water spots, but it is not something that we recommend. It is really up to you, the consumer. We do not recommend waxing the powder-coated rails on your fence. It is not like a painted surface and will leave residue in the small textures of the powder coat. Refer to the Post-Season Boat Maintenance video in the owner’s manual for additional information about cleaning-polishing and waxing your Veranda. We do not recommend waxing the powder-coated rails on your fence. It is not like a painted surface and will leave residue in the small textures of the powder coat. Supporting your boat in every way will keep you from having to repair or replace broken items before it should be necessary to ensure a lifetime of enjoyment. Use a power washer on a light setting to get any dirt or mildew off your boat that may have built up over the off-season. Once done and dried, apply cleaner, buff, and apply products such as Shark Hide to keep it fresh and taken care of!

Inspect the Trailer
The final step in pre-season boat maintenance involves inspecting your BackTrack Trailer. Just like your boat, the trailer is one of the most important things you’ll be using all summer. You want to make sure your tires and wires are all up to the standard code. Check the air pressure in your tires before using your trailer, and if one is flat or damaged, it’s time to replace it. You don’t want tire problems on the road. You are legally required to have working turn signals on your boat’s trailer. Ensure all lights are working, and ask a family member or friend to keep an eye on them while you test your signals and brakes. Cold winter months are tough on brake bulbs, so care and caution are advised.

We hope you have found this pre-season boat maintenance segment of the Veranda Luxury Pontoons owner’s manual useful to ensure your investment is ready for the upcoming boating season and a lifetime of enjoyment that it will provide.

For additional information please reach out to your nearest authorized Veranda dealer or visit www.verandamarine.com.

We are thrilled that you have chosen the Veranda Luxury Pontoons Vista View Series. With proper care and maintenance, you will be able to maximize the benefits from your hard-earned investment for many boating seasons to come. Using the provided clip cover on your Vista View will help keep the interior clean, dry and reduce exposure to the elements. Installation and removal of this cover are much easier when done with another person to assist you versus being alone. Here are the steps you will need to properly install the clip cover on your Vista View. 

  • Remove the playpen cover from the storage bag.
  • Place the playpen cover and poles to the side of the main walkway, so they will not make a trip hazard. 
  • Have one person stand on the bow and the other toward the stern, unfold, and stretch the playpen until it is fully open. Your cover may have a white tag with “Forward Center” written on it. If so, position this part of the cover at the bow end.
  • Starting with the starboard side, place the cover over the edge of the seats so it hangs down the entire side of the fence. It’s helpful to begin on this side because the helm and windshield help to hold the cover in place during setup. Be sure to line up the cutouts along the side of the cover for the bimini mount bracket and trailer leg. You may need to step onto the stern and bow swim decks to stretch it out fully.
  • Please note that there are no velcro side pockets on the Vista View clip cover.
  • Next, insert the bottom of the plastic clip into the groove located on the underside of the top rail. Work your way around from stern to bow or whatever is most convenient, based upon whether you are moored at a marina or standing on the ground beside your pontoon on the trailer. You will find that working from outside the pontoon is much easier.   
  • Repeat the same steps on the other side of the pontoon until all the clips are secured.   
  • The next step involves setting up the four support poles under the cover, which helps to keep rainwater and leaves from settling on the cover. Be sure to grab a flashlight or your smartphone so you can see what you are doing under there.
  • Starting on one end of the pontoon, you will need to open up the cam lock and extend the top section of the extension pole into the base plate on the underside of the cover. Extend the pole until it’s snug again the cover and floor then close the cam lock. Repeat this process for each support pole.  
  • Once the pole is secured in place, exit the pontoon and close the gates.

To remove the clip cover on your Vista View you will need to do the following:

  • Grab a flashlight or your smartphone, open the bow entry gate, crawl under to cover, and lower the extension poles.
  • Remove poles.
  • Starting with the starboard side, fold 1/3 of the edge of the starboard side over onto the middle and then repeat on the port side, so it has 3 layers of material and two folds.
  • Put the cover in the storage bag and place it under one of the rear seats.

Disclaimer:

This is a mooring cover and should not be used during trailering. Always remove the cover before trailering and stow it under one of the rear seats. Vista View owners can also upgrade to a ratchet cover for an additional cost, whether during your initial purchase or afterward from your local dealer. For additional information please reach out to your nearest authorized Veranda dealer or visit www.tumacscovers.com or www.taylormadeproducts.com.

Our Trailer Maintenance video is coming soon. In the meantime, please contact your nearest authorized dealer for assistance.

Our Maintaining Your Yamaha video is coming soon. In the meantime, please contact your nearest authorized dealer for assistance.

Our Cleaning Panels & Logs video is coming soon. In the meantime, please contact your nearest authorized dealer for assistance.

Our Cleaning Floors video is coming soon. In the meantime, please contact your nearest authorized dealer for assistance.

Our Cleaning Upholstery video is coming soon. In the meantime, please contact your nearest authorized dealer for assistance.

It is truly an honor to have you as a Veranda Luxury Pontoons customer and it is our intent to ensure you reap the utmost benefits from your investment. One of the easiest ways to protect your investment is our custom ratchet cover, designed to keep the interior clean and dry from exposure to the elements. Please note that installation and removal of the ratchet cover are much easier when done with two people and from outside the pontoon, but can be done from within the pontoon working from one end to the other. Please follow these steps to ensure the proper installation of your ratchet cover.

  • Remove the playpen cover from the storage bag.
  • Place the playpen cover and poles on the starboard side of the main walkway, so they will not make a trip hazard. 
  • Grab the cover and stretch it out to the length of the pontoon. Have one person stand on the bow and the other toward the stern, unfold, and lay the playpen cover out so that the ratchet, located inside a zipper pocket, is positioned at the stern. Your cover may have a white tag with “Forward Center” written on it. If so, position this part of the cover at the bow end. 
  • Starting with the starboard side, place the cover over the edge of the seats so it hangs down the entire side of the fence. It’s helpful to begin on this side because the helm and windshield help to hold the cover in place during setup. You may need to step onto the stern and bow swim decks to stretch it out fully.
  • On Relax and Fish Series, someone will need to open up the velcro pocket, slip it over the bimini mount bracket and trailer leg and then secure it on the side hanging down. You do not have to do this step for models with a powered bimini, such as our VP and Vertex Series since the cover will lay over the top of the entire bimini.
  • Next, grab the corner straps and wrap each around the bow and stern cleat horns on the starboard side.
  • Now repeat this same process on the port side, placing the cover over the edge of the seats, securing the velcro pocket around the bimini mount bracket and trailer leg on Relax and Fish Series, and wrapping the corner straps around the bow and stern cleat horns on the port side, until all four corners are attached. 
  • If you are unable to install the cover from outside your pontoon, you will want to work from one end to the other until the entire cover is secured over the interior.
  • The next step involves setting up the support poles under the cover, which helps to keep rainwater and leaves from settling on the cover. Your cover will have 4-5 telescoping support poles depending upon the length and model of your pontoon. Be sure to grab a flashlight or your smartphone so you can see what you are doing under there.
  • Starting on one end of the pontoon, you will need to open up the cam lock and extend the top section of the extension pole into the base plate on the underside of the cover. Extend the pole until it’s snug again the cover and floor then close the cam lock. Repeat this process for each support pole.  
  • If you have never used a ratchet before, then pay attention to this next segment: Close the ratchet mechanism, run the bitter end of the strap through the slot in the windlass, that is the opening in the center, and pull the strap back in the direction it entered until it is taut. Now with your other hand, grab the ratchet handle and open it up and close it to tighten the strap. The spring-loaded dog will begin to catch the rotation of the windless, holding the load. To release the ratchet, pull and disengage the clutch lever and lift the ratchet handle straight to free up the strap. Please note, if you do not render most of the webbing away from the load before you tighten it, it will create a big wad of webbing on the mechanism and prevent it from working efficiently. 
  • On the stern swim deck, unzip the pocket to access the ratchet, crank on the handle of the mechanism one to two times until the cover is tightly secured around the entire fence.
  • Get under the cover, close the rear entry gate, crawl to the bow and exit the pontoon, zipping the cover closed as you leave. 

To remove the ratchet cover on your Veranda you will need to do the following:

  • First of all, you will need to grab a flashlight, crawl under the cover and remove the telescoping support poles.
  • Next, release the load on the ratchet located on the stern to loosen the webbing on the cover.
  • Remove the straps from the four corner cleat horns.
  • Preferably with the help of another person, you will want to fold the cover hanging down the side over towards the center the long way. For Relax and Fish Series, you will need to open up the velcro pocket to free it from the bimini mount bracket and trailer leg. 
  • Fold up 1/3 of the outer section onto the center then fold other outside 1/3 onto the center.
  • Now lay the folded cover on the center walkway and beginning at one end, roll the cover up. Be sure to place the support poles which you have lowered to the shortest length, inside the cover as you roll it up.  
  • Put the cover in the storage bag and stow it in one of the rear storage compartments, not in the in-floor storage.

Disclaimer:

This is a mooring cover and should not be used during trailering. Always remove the cover before trailering. To prevent damage, mold, and odor, do not store the cover in the in-floor storage area, rather stow it under one of the rear seats. For additional information please reach out to your nearest authorized Veranda dealer or visit www.tumacscovers.com or www.taylormadeproducts.com.